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the-water-diviner

My sister and I watched The Water Diviner  last week, and it was one of those movies that stays with you. An Australian historical war drama, it starred Russell Crowe and was also his first time directing. The film opened in Australia and New Zealand in December of 2014, with a limited release in the United States the following spring.

Shortly after the end of World War I an Australian farmer named Joshua Conner travels to Turkey where his three sons died serving in the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC). He travels to Gallipolli where they died so he can find them and bring them home so they can be buried beside their mother. In the end he learns far more than the location of his sons’ bodies.

What happened to his sons is told through a series of flashbacks. The battle scenes are stark and realistic. Rather than glorifying one side or the other, they show brief glimpses of humanity along with the cruelties of war. In every battle and on both sides there are young men fighting for their country, their ideals and what they believe to be right.

I couldn’t help but admire Russell Crowe’s first attempt at directing. The movie was very touching and it made me think.

 

turkish-coffee-photoTurkish coffee is a method of preparing unfiltered coffee. Coffee beans are roast and finely ground and then they are simmered (not boiled) in a pot. They can be served with or without with sugar and poured into a cup where the grounds are allowed to settle. Turkish coffee has a significant part in this movie.

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